RESEARCH

 

MULTIPLE TARGETS VIA SELECTIVE TRANSFORMATIONS FROM A COMMON MOLECULAR UNIT: 
The unifying theme of our group is discovery and design of advanced molecular intermediates able to serve as common platforms for synthesis of various, structurally related (proceeding from same key subunit) compounds – potential therapeutic agents and drug candidates. Unlike existing classic synthetic “target-directed” methods, our constructing methodology will offer conceptually new perspective, enabling to deliver multiple targets via sequence of controlled, simple and atom economy reactions from a single common molecular unit; thus, providing simplified access to a wide variety of important classes of biologically active and structurally interesting molecules.

THE CONCEPT: 
The presence of similar fundamental core structures is not exclusive to chemical compounds extracted from the same natural source. Common or highly resembling structures can be identified throughout various forms of life, such as different (and often distantly related) families of plants, as well as fungi and even bacteria. The cores (building blocks) will be identified, designed and synthesized, ultimately, to have an access to different classes of natural products and important biologically active compounds, as well as new techniques for the preparation of structurally unique novel molecules. All targets and transformations will be selected on the basis of novel molecular architecture, important biological activity, and the potential for mechanistic studies. ​
 
 
PROGRAM AND DISCIPLINES:
Building upon the foundations of synthetic organic chemistry, the research program of our group will invoke a broad interdisciplinary collaboration with other fields such as, medicinal chemistry, organometallic chemistry, biochemistry, pharmacology and medicine.
 
​RESEARCH TOPICS:
1. Design and development of new reactions/transformations, catalysts, and synthetic methodologies.
2. Application  of  novel  methodology  through the  synthesis  of  biologically  important  compounds,  target-oriented total synthesis of natural products, and diversity oriented synthesis of natural product-like molecules and drug candidates. Molecules thus built will be employed in the investigation of biologically significant processes. 
3. Mechanistic studies of novel synthetic transformations.